Pet Library

Pyometra

OverviewPyometra is a complicated disease that is triggered by bacterial involvement. It is an infection of the uterus that can occur in cats and dogs and makes them very ill. The cyclical hormonal influences of female cats and dogs lets the uterus go through changes that will be acceptable for fertilization of an embryo. If bacteria get introduced to the uterus at a specific time during the cycle, hormonal regulation of the uterus starts the infection, which can become life-threatening.Cats and dogs that are spayed early in their life will most likely not develop pyometra. However, a ...

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Cushing’s Syndrome in Dogs

What is Cushing’s Syndrome and How Does it Affect Dogs?When your dog’s body creates too much of a hormone called cortisol, Cushing’s syndrome will occur. Cortisol is a chemical that helps dogs control their weight, respond to stress, fight infections and keep their blood sugar at a steady level. However, too much cortisol—or too little—can cause issues.Cushing’s syndrome—also known as hyperadrenocorticism or hypercortisolism—can sometimes be difficult to diagnose, since it has similar symptoms to other conditions. To help your vet make a diagnosis, indicate to them any...

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Heartworm Disease

Heartworm disease is very serious, as it can result in severe lung disease, heart failure and even death in pets. Heartworms are spread through mosquito bites, which results in worms producing offspring inside your pet. These worms live in the heart, lungs and blood vessels of an infected animal.Heartworm in DogsWhen an infected mosquito bites a dog, the mosquito spreads the infective larvae of heartworms to the dog through the bite wound. For the now newly infected dog, it usually takes about six or seven months for the larvae to develop into adult heartworms, which then mate, causing...

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Pet Vaccinations: Individualized Protection for Your Pet

When it comes to pet vaccines, there isn’t a one-size-fits-all protocol. In fact, each dog or cat could require different vaccinations based upon a number of factors, including:Where kind of environment does the pet live in? Does the pet travel and, if so, where and how often? If the pet is a dog, do they go to dog parks, doggie daycare, kennels or the groomer? If the pet is a cat, do they go outdoors or live with other cats that do?We understand you want your pet to be protected, but not over-vaccinated. That’s why our veterinarians regularly review ongoing veterinary resea...

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Intestinal Parasites

Your pet is not only your best friend, but a very valuable member of your family. We all want the best for our loved ones, so it’s important to always keep them as healthy as possible. For dogs and cats, it’s not uncommon for them to get infected with either an internal or external parasite at some point in their lives.These undesirable parasites can potentially affect your pet in a number of ways ranging from small irritation to causing fatal conditions if left untreated. Certain parasites are also zoonotic, meaning they can even infect your human family members as well!Below, we...

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Flea Bite Allergies in Pets

Flea allergic dermatitis and flea bite hypersensitivity are the two most common skin diseases in pets. Flea allergies can begin at any age for pets, and it is commonly believed that flea saliva is the cause of allergic reactions or sensitivity. For dogs and cats, allergies usually develop when they are young (less than one and up to five years old).The life cycle of a flea includes the adult flea, egg, larva and pupa. While adult fleas do bite, they can’t survive long if they aren’t on the animal. When an adult flea lays its eggs on the host, it will fall off and leave the eggs to mut...

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Canine Parvovirus

OverviewCanine parvovirus (CPV) is a disease that affects the gastrointestinal tract of dogs. Highly contagious, this virus can affect all dogs, however, canines that are the most at-risk of parvovirus are unvaccinated dogs and puppies that are younger than four months old.Parvo can get spread through direct dog-to-dog contact as well as through contact with contaminated feces, people or environments. It is also capable of contaminated things like kennel surfaces, bowls, leashes, collars and the clothing and hands of those who treat infected dogs.This virus can be easily transmit...

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Blastomycosis (Fungal Infection) in Pets

What is Blastomycosis?Blastomycosis, caused by the organism Blastomyces dermatitidis, is a systematic yeast-like fungal infection. Blastomyces dermatitidis is often found in soil and decaying wood—canines that venture in environments where these properties are common are often at-risk of Blastomycosis.The Blastomyces fungus flourishes in damp and wet environments, including swamps, lakes and riverbanks—the wet soil of these surroundings lacks direct sunlight, which fosters the growth of the fungus. It is also prevalent in places with decaying matter, including farms, forests and w...

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All About the Feline Viruses FIP, FIV and FeLV

FIP, FIV and FeLV are all viral diseases that can affect your kitty cat. Unfortunately, none of these viruses has a cure, however they can all be prevented with proper, responsible care.What Exactly is FIP?FIP stands for feline infectious peritonitis. FIP is caused by a mutation of the coronavirus, which is also a common cause of diarrhea and upset stomach for felines. Households that contain multiple cats are the most at-risk of FIP, since these cats commonly share litter trays. Along with multi-cat homes, other locales that are at risk of FIP include shelters, catteries and breeding...

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Bladder Stones in Pets

Bladder stones, commonly found in dogs and cats, cause blockage and urinary tract infections. Bladder stones that are found in pets are similar to those found in humans—they are usually composed of mineral salts from common elements such as calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, carbonates and ammonia. These stones usually form in the pet’s bladder and often vary in size and number.Unless the stones break off or lodge in your pet’s urethra, the stones usually do not affect any other part of your pet’s body. When they do get lodged in the urethra, this can potentially lead to urinary trac...

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